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Whitewater Rafting Guide To River Trips

British Columbia

The Western most province in Canada is home to the second largest city in the Pacific Northwest, Vancouver. Most of the the river rafting featured here is within a three hour drive north-east from Vancouver and an hour’s drive east from the town of Whistler. British Columbia is known for its varied climates, most unusal being the sub-mediterranean climate of Victoria on Vancouver Island.

Fraser River Rafting (Class III):

Ride rapids such as “Scuzzy Rock” and “China Bar” through scenic Fraser Canyon in comfort and safety. Enjoy the majestic views, wildlife and cultural history on this diverse and incredible waterway.

Nahatlatch River Rafting (Class III-IV):

The section from the Nahatlatch lakes to the Canyon entrance features 25 rapids and an average gradient of 85 feet per mile. What makes the Nahatlatch so addictive and perfect for rafting is the near-continuous, rapid-fire white water. Few rivers in North America offer such continuous action, yet are still suitable for first-time rafters.

Stein River Rafting (Class IV):

The steepest commercially rafted river in Canada, the Stein is a challenging white water rafting adventure, ideal for advanced whitewater paddlers and adventurers.

Thompson River Rafting (Class III-IV):

Wild and fast and known for its cold, high water. The warm desert like climate of B.C.’s interior make this a perfect river for summer rafting fun.

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More about rafting in British Columbia, Canada

Lush coastal lowlands and desert like river canyons make host to a dizzying amount of wildlife species throughout British Columbia. Mountain goats, moose, caribou, bighorn sheep, cougar and three types of bear (Black, Grizzly and Kermode or “spirit bear” named for its cream colored coat) make their homes in the region. With such a broad range of wildlife, you’re likely to see a creature or two that you won’t ever see on a typical day in your neighborhood. An intense amount of salmon, including steelhead, and other spawning fish fight their way upstream each season and though you won’t see them from your raft, the entire world’s population of Pacific Grey Whales migrates up the coast of British Columbia past Victoria Island twice a year!